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Phonics

Phonics at Clare House

At Clare House we use the Sounds Write approach to phonics. This is a scheme which is very effective in teaching pupils to read, spell and write.  It starts from children’s knowledge of sounds and builds on this through a carefully sequenced set of steps through each of the 44 sounds in the English language and how they can be spelt.  

The sounds are introduced in a simple way in Reception and gradually increase in complexity.  For example, as single letter sounds are being learned children learn to read and build simple CVC (consonant, vowel, consonant) words. They quickly learn to read and spell words such as ‘mum’, ‘jam’, ‘hat’ and so on. Following this, they progress through more complex one syllable words which have more letters, such as ‘hand’, ‘swim’, ‘scrub’ and ‘trust’.  The next step is learning that two letters can represent one sound and more common two-letter spellings such as ‘ch’, ‘sh’ and ‘th’ in words like ‘shop’, ‘thin’, or ‘chip’.  Finally, two, three and four letter spellings of the vowels are introduced and pupils are taught how to read and spell polysyllabic words, starting with simpler words (such as ‘bedbug’) and moving on to more complex ones (such as ‘mathematical’)

All of this is taught within a well-structured, incremental and coherent framework which leads to the conceptual understanding needed to become an effective reader.  Reading and spelling also require expertise in the skills necessary to make use of the alphabet code and pupils need to be able to:

  • segment, or separate sounds into words
  • blend, or push sounds together to form words
  • manipulate sounds: take sounds out and put sounds into words.

Sounds Write provides opportunities for practising these skills on an everyday basis until pupils achieve the automaticity required for fluent reading and spelling.


PHONICS-TEACHING-AT-CLARE-HOUSE-PRESENTATION-1-1.PPTXLETTER-FORMATION-POWERPOINT-WITH-PHONIC-SOUNDS.PDFPHONICS-TEACHING-OVERVIEW-2021.PDFEYFS-LETTER-FORMATION-GUIDE-FOR-PARETS

Writing

Reading

We love reading at Clare House and so the teachers thought it would be a great idea to share their favourite books with you so you can gain as much pleasure from them as we did. Please see them below listed by year groups.

We have also included a list of 100 books to read before you leave Primary school. How many have you read already? Could you read all of the 100 books before you finish Year 6? These books can be read by children, shared between children and adults or read by adults to children. Give them a try and see which ones you love best.

Of course, we often read alone but you might read a book at the same time as your friends and then talk about it together. You might feel inspired to write your own book - we'd love to read it if you do. You might talk to your class about the best book you read from this list or you might know fantastic books that you would recommend that are not on this list.

We all need and love getting a recommendation for a great book - so here are some for you.

Happy reading!
Mrs Holland


Reading-at-home-useful-resources.pdfReadingQuestionsKS1-1.pdfReadingQuestionsKS1.pdfReadingQuestionsKS2-1.pdfReadingQuestionsKS2.pdfYEAR-PLAN-FOR-ENGLISH-2021-2021

Maths

Maths

History

At Clare House, history is taught through the IPC (International Primary Curriculum). Children develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history. They are taught to use key historical terms accurately and ask their own historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. Children are expected to think critically and develop their knowledge of the past from a range of sources. By the end of their time at Clare House, they will be able to see the relationship between different periods of time and the impact on modern life.

By the end of KS1, a historian at Clare House are expected to…

  • Know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time.
  • Identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods.
  • Use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms.
  • Ask and answer questions.
  • Know and understand key features of events.
  • Understand the ways in which we find out about the past.
  • Identify different ways in which history is represented.

By the end of Lower KS2, a historian at Clare House are expected to…

  • Begin to be able to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British and world history.
  • Start to be able to identify connections, contrasts and trends over time.
  • Begin to be able to develop the appropriate use of historical terms, such as ‘empire’ and ‘civilisation.’
  • Begin to be able to address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Begin to be able to construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Begin to be able to construct knowledge of the past from a range of sources.
  • Begin to be able to describe the impact of history on modern life.

By the end of Upper KS2, a historian at Clare House are expected to…

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history.
  • Be able to identify connections, contrasts and trends over time.
  • Develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Be able to construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Be able to construct knowledge of the past from a range of sources.
  • Be able to describe the impact of history on modern life.

Geography

Geography is taught through the IPC curriculum, enabling children to make links with other subjects. Children are taught to develop: their knowledge of globally significant places, including defining human and physical characteristics; their understanding of processes that cause key physical and human characteristics and how these are interdependent; the geographical skills needed to collect and analyse data through fieldwork; skills needed to interpret a range of sources of geographical information (such as maps, globes, aerial photographs). Children are taught to communicate their geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps and also through writing.

By the end of KS1, a geographer at Clare House are expected to…

- Use maps, atlases and globes to name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans and also to name, locate and identify the characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas. 

- Understand and explain the simple geographical features of different places (through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country). 

- Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles. 

- Use geographical vocabulary accurately to refer to key physical features (including beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather) and key human features (including city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop). 

- Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map. 

- Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key. 

- Plan and record observations in fieldwork to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a geographer at Clare House are expected to…

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to: 

  1. locate the world’s countries focusing on Europe (including Russia) and North and South America; and  
  1. name and locate counties and cities of the UK, geographical regions and human and physical characteristics. 

Understand and explain the differences and similarities of different geographical places and how they affect and interact with each other. 

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to identify the UK’s key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time. 

- Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes. 

- Describe and understand key aspects human geography, including types of settlement and land use. 

- Use the 8 points of a compass to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world. 

- Plan and record observations in fieldwork productively to collect and record evidence to answer geographical questions. 

By the end of Upper KS2, a geographer at Clare House should be able to…

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to identify the environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, and major cities when locating the world’s countries. 

- Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones including day and night. 

- Explain how the different human and physical geographical features of a place interact with each other (through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America). 

- Describe accurately key aspects of physical geography, including rivers and the water cycle. 

- Describe accurately key aspects of human geography, including: economic activity including trade links and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water. 

- Use four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key correctly (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps). 

- Use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies. 

 

Science

Science is taught through the IPC, which enables us to meet the expectations set out in the National Curriculum. It is mostly taught through discrete Science units however, where appropriate, links are made through the IPC units. We provide children with opportunities to investigate and make links with the wider world. At Key Stage 1, children are taught to work scientifically while learning about plants, animals including humans, everyday materials, seasonal changes and living things and their habitats. At Key Stage 2, children are also taught about rocks, light, forces and magnets, states of matter, sound, electricity, properties and changes of materials, earth and space, evolution and inheritance. In Year 6 children are taught about puberty with an element of age-appropriate sex education. Parents are able, on request and after discussion with the Head Teacher, to withdraw their child from this. However, parents may not withdraw their child from any part of the science national curriculum. Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) We have chosen to provide an element of age-appropriate sex education to our Upper Key Stage 2 pupils. Parents are able, on request and after discussion with the Head Teacher, to withdraw their child from this. However, parents may not withdraw their child from any part of the relationships education nor the science national curriculum. The objective of relationships education at Clare House is to reach, in an age-appropriate way, the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of healthy relationships with friends, family and other people in order to help our children build an inclusive, tolerant society.

By the end of KS1, a scientist at Clare House should be able to…

- Ask simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways 

- Observe closely, using simple equipment 

- Perform simple tests 

- Identify and classify 

- Use observations and prior knowledge to suggest answers to questions 

- Gather, record and analyse data using simple scientific language 

- With help, be able to gather information from a variety of sources. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a scientist at Clare House should be able to…

- Ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquiries to answer them 

- Set up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests 

- Make systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, take accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers 

- Gather, record, classify and present data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions 

- Record findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables.  Report these findings in different ways including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions 

- Use results and evidence to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions 

- Identify differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes. 

By the end of Upper KS2, a scientist at Clare House should be able to…

- Plan different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary 

- Take measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate 

- Record data and results of increasing complexity in a variety of ways, such as, using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs 

- Use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests 

- Draw conclusions by identifying patterns through interpreting observations, measurements and data 

- Report and present findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and a degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations 

- Identify scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments. 

 

Art & Design and Technology

We teach art through a range of different key skills. These are drawing, painting, printing, textiles, sculpture and collage. We ensure that these skills are practised and developed across the Key Stages so that the children have a wealth of expertise from which they can make creative and informed choices about their own artwork. We also teach history of art to develop our children’s knowledge of a range of artists, their work and different art movements. We look at artists work for inspiration, as examples of particular skills and to develop children’s critical appreciation of art from different cultures and times.

By the end of KS1, an artist at Clare House should be able to…

-Make marks and draw lines purposefully and for artistic effect. 

- Mix colours purposefully for artistic effect  

- Use printing techniques for artistic effect and to develop a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.   

- Experiment and develop proficiency with a range of textile techniques for artistic effect. 

- Develop a growing awareness of shape and form and to develop a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.  

- Develop proficiency in a range of collage skills and techniques for artistic effect. 

- Have a knowledge of a variety of artists both contemporary and historical. 

By the end of Lower KS2, an artist at Clare House should be able to…

- Mix colours purposefully for artistic effect  

- Use printing techniques for artistic effect and to develop a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.   

- Experiment and develop proficiency with a range of textile techniques for artistic effect. 

- Sculpt with clay and develop a growing awareness of shape and form and to develop proficiency in a range of tools and techniques.  

- Develop proficiency in a range of collage skills and techniques for artistic effect. 

- Have a knowledge of a variety of artists both contemporary and historical. 

By the end of Upper KS2, an artist at Clare House should be able to…

- Combine different tools to create a drawing and explain why they have chosen those techniques.  

- Use a wide range of techniques in their work, to use a range of colours that they have created and to be able to discuss their own individual style.  

- Create a print that expresses their own ideas, observations and feelings and demonstrates a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.   

- Create a piece of work that uses tactile and visual elements and to be able to use tools and techniques with increasing proficiency. 

- Create a piece of sculpture that shows an awareness of shape, form and dimension and demonstrates good proficiency in a range of tools and techniques.  

- Compose and apply an understanding of shape and space in a piece of collage work and to select which skills and techniques they need to use to present their idea.  

- Have a knowledge of a variety of artists both contemporary and historical.  

 

Computing

At Clare House Primary School we embrace current and emerging technologies to facilitate the learning experience of the whole school community. We aim for our children to be confident, competent and discerning users of digital technology and it is our intention that 7 they have every opportunity available to achieve this. We provide a computing curriculum that develops pupil’s learning and results in the acquisition of knowledge of the world around them. A clear and effective scheme of work is used to ensure that teaching and learning facilitates progression across all key stages within the strands of digital literacy, information technology and computer science. Children will have access to the hardware (computers, tablets and programmable equipment) and software that they need to develop knowledge and skills of digital systems and their applications. Furthermore, we provide a computing curriculum that prepares pupils to live safely in an increasingly digital society. At Clare House, children explore and respond to key issues such as digital communication, cyberbullying, online safety, security and social media. Through the wider curriculum, displays, parental communication, safer internet days and assemblies are used to equip children with the knowledge they need to stay safe online, enabling them to have a secure and comprehensive knowledge of the implication of technology and digital systems.

By the end of KS1, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Plan out and enter a sequence of commands accurately to carry out a specific task (programming).  

- Reorder a sequence of instructions effectively and correct errors in programs successfully (debug). 

- Use programs, apps and computer networks successfully to find, organise and classify information. To be able to send and receive mail.  

- Use letters, basic punctuation, spacebar and enter key to type words and sentences quickly. To use the shift key for punctuation and can use the backspace to make corrections.  

- Edit and improve work by changing, adding or removing words as well as change the font size, colour and style.  

- Explain how to stay safe online and know what to do if somebody feels unsafe.  

- Meet specific criteria by correctly creating images though paint, use a photograph within a document and capture a video. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Accurately write a program for a specific purpose, incorporating features such as inputs, repetition and procedure. To test existing programs to see how they could be improved by identifying errors.  

- Create a branching database accurately, as well as effectively filter and sort records in a database to answer questions. 

- Present data in a graph, selecting the most appropriate layout. To add text and numbers to a spreadsheet, use simple formulas and change the appearances of a cell e.g. colour/borders. 

- Effectively use different layouts and effects (such as text box, columns, tables, justification, borders, background colour) to refine and improve work (word processing) and to be able to add a background colour and add slide transitions and animation effects successfully (presentation). 

- Explain how and why it is important to keep my personal information private and stay safe online, displaying myself appropriately online e.g. avatar, code name and know what to do when somebody feels unsafe.  

-Type in a URL (or use a search engine) to find a website and to explain why not all information found online is accurate or appropriate.  

- Use the print screen function to capture an image as well as order and group images To be able to crop and rotate an image where necessary. To plan and create an animation for a given purpose using a range of multimedia e.g. images, photos, videos etc. 

 By the end of Upper KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Successfully design and create a game, app and / or model, incorporating variables and different forms of input and output. 

- Effectively test, debug and modify a program to improve it after identifying errors. 

- Use search engines effectively, and to explain how search results are selected and ranked. To be selective with research and apply it to a range of presentation formats.  

- Discuss and evaluate documents, and effectively make amendments as needed. (Word Processing)  

- Understand that some websites have age restrictions, and why these might be in place. To explain different ways to report concerns about content & contact. (Online Collaboration) 

- Describe the opportunities computer networks and the internet offer for communication and collaboration. 

- Select, use and evaluate appropriate multimedia tools and combine these for a given purpose with confidence. 

Music

The music curriculum at Clare House is delivered through a combination of specialist music teachers from Bromley Youth Music Trust and the IPC curriculum. Throughout their Clare House journey children will: - learn to play the Djembe Drums. - learn to play the recorder - take part in the ‘Band on the Run’ project (brass/woodwind) - take part in the school choir Children will be given the opportunity to showcase their musical skills at various performances throughout the year. Through the IPC curriculum, teachers will focus on skills such as: playing pitched and unpitched instruments; developing musical vocabulary; using the inter-related dimensions of music (e.g. using pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture and structure) to create, select and combine sounds; improvisation; recognising stave and other musical notation; composition; and evaluating recorded and live music. In addition to this, we have weekly singing assemblies, where children learn songs from different genres and cultures. We also celebrate composers from around the world.

By the end of KS1, a musician at Clare House should be able to…

- Use voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes  

- Play unpitched instruments musically 

- Play pitched instruments musically 

- Listen and demonstrate a musical response to a range of high-quality live and recorded music 

- Experiment with sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music 

- Create, select and combine sounds for musical purposes e.g. using pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure 

- Describe what it is about a piece of music that makes them feel a certain way  

By the end of Lower KS2, a musician at Clare House should be able to…

- Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, playing musical instruments with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression 

- Improvise music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music e.g. pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure 

- Begin to develop their musical vocabulary and be able to use this to express themselves in performance 

- Understand a wide range of high-quality recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians 

- Have an understanding of the lives of some key composers from history e.g. Johann Sebastian BachWolfgang Amadeus MozartLudwig van Beethoven, and Richard Wagner 

- Reflect on a piece of music, discussing the inter-related dimensions of music e.g. pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure 

- Describe how a piece of music makes them feel, discussing the inter-related dimensions of music e.g. pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure 

By the end of Upper KS2, a musician at Clare House should be able to…

- Perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using their voices with accuracy, fluency, control and expression 

- Compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music e.g. pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure 

- Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory 

- Recognise staff and use different musical notations for musical ideas 

- Use musical vocabulary to be able to express themselves in composition 

- Develop an understanding of how music illuminates the historical and geographical features of a time period 

- Evaluate a piece of recorded or live music focusing on the inter-related dimensions of music e.g. pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture, structure  

P.E.

P.E is delivered through a combination of external and internal specialist teachers. In EYFS and Key Stage 1, fundamental movement skills and coordination are taught and practised through a variety of activities. In Key Stage 2, children practise and learn a broad range of skills, enabling them to play competitive games. Whilst at Clare House, children are given the opportunity to participate in swimming lessons, enabling them children to learn how to swim 25 meters competently and perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations. Children also take part in games competitions, competing against other schools.

By the end of KS1, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Master the fundamental movements (running, jumping, hoping, side-stepping, walking backwards, running backwards, skipping and galloping). 

- Master basic agility, balance and co-ordination skills, individually and with others. 

- Send and receive successfully, using a variety of objects. 

- Successfully employ simple tactics for defending and attacking as an individual. 

- Engage in competitive physical activities successfully (both against self and against others). 

- Begin to learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and copy teacher movements to make actions (Dance) and sequences of movement (Gymnastics). 

- Work well individually and with others, learning to take turns if needed and work co-operatively as part of a team. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Demonstrate a broad range of skills and demonstrate these in isolation and small groups/ conditioned matches. 

- Begin to develop my flexibility, strength, technique, control, balance and stamina. 

- Begin to understand simple tactics and formations to use in a team environment. 

- Begin to learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and link them to make actions (Dance) and sequences of movement (Gymnastics). 

- Demonstrate an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports, reflecting on the performance of myself and my peers. 

- Follow the sportsmanship code and demonstrate the qualities that make a great team member. 

- Enjoy communicating and competing with my class mates and myself (Individual best). 

By the end of Upper KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, in isolation and small groups/ matches. 

- Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control, balance and stamina. 

- Successfully employ simple tactics or creative process in practical settings. 

- Learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and link them to make precise actions (Dance) and sequences of movement (Gymnastics). 

- Explain specific progression routes in different physical activities and coach my peers to help them improve. 

- Demonstrate effect and appropriate communication, collaboration and respectful competition with each other and myself (Individual best).  

- Confidently lead an activity e.g. warm up, cool down, simple game, which engages all others involved, showing respect and empathy. 

 

R.E.

At Clare House, RE is taught as part of our wider curriculum and we teach this subject in blocks throughout the year, enabling children to gain knowledge and understanding of different faiths and religions. Our RE curriculum follows the principles and guidelines set out by the Bromley Agreed Syllabus. Throughout their Clare House journey, children will learn about Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Islam and Buddhism.

By the end of KS1, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Use some religious words and phrases accurately to recognise and name features of religious life.  

- Recall and retell religious stories and explain meanings for religious actions and symbols. 

- Demonstrate the knowledge that religions have similarities and differences.  

- Talk about, ask and respond sensitively to questions about their own and others’ experiences and feelings. 

- Recognise that some questions cause people to wonder and are difficult to answer. 

- Recognise and respect that religions contain a set of values believed to be inspired by a deity.   

- Know and respect that people are different in a variety of ways and to appreciate these qualities in each other. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Describe accurately some key features of religions studied, recognising similarities and differences.  

- Explain how religious stories and sacred texts inform beliefs using examples.  

- Begin to identify some of the impacts religion has on believers lives.  

- Discuss different religions and their feelings about them sensitively and respectfully.  

- Ask questions about religion, making links between their own and others’ responses. 

- Recognise and respect that religions contain a set of values believed to be inspired by a deity.   

- Have knowledge of and understand that all religions play a role in caring for the environment around us.  

By the end of Upper KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Accurately describe and show understanding of sources, practices and ideas, feelings and experiences. 

- Identify and describe some similarities and differences of beliefs of different religions.  

- Describe accurately and sensitively some key impacts of religion on people’s lives. 

- Identify meanings for a range of forms of religious expression. 

- Ask and answer sensible and appropriate questions of identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitments.  

- Recognise and respect that religions contain a set of values believed to be inspired by a deity.   

Understand and explain the importance and significance of journeys to a range of people, both religious and non-religious.  

 

Primary Languages

French is taught throughout Key Stage 2 by a Primary Languages’ specialist, there is also a Chinese club, designed to challenge our most able linguists. The French lessons follow a bespoke curriculum, using a variety of engaging, authentic resources. Progression is based on the four skills as listed in the programme of study, and these are enhanced using physical French phonics, target language cross curricular work (CLIL) and transferable skills for KS3, all of which provide regular opportunities for inter-cultural understanding.

By the end of Lower KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding. 

- Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link to the spelling, sound and meaning of sound. 

- Engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others.  

- Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures. 

- Develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words, phrases and simple writing. 

- Appreciate stories, songs, poems and rhymes in the target language. 

- Develop an interest and understanding of other cultures and traditions through language. 

By the end of Upper KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Present ideas and information to an audience. 

- Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into familiar written material, including using a bilingual dictionary. 

- Write phrases and adapt these to create new sentences to express ideas clearly. 

- Understand grammar appropriate to the language with relevant meta language, and can apply these rules, for instance to build sentences (And how these differ from or are similar to English). 

- Follow routines and classroom instructions in the target language, when supported by prompts and gestures. 

- Express and justify opinions on a variety of subjects. 

- Read and translate, using a variety of authentic resources

Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE)

PSHE is taught through the themes of Living in the Wider World, Relationships and Health and Wellbeing. We teach the knowledge, skills and attributes to stay healthy and safe and to be prepared for life and work. PSHE is taught through weekly Key Stage assemblies, class circle assemblies, Time for Talk, The IPC curriculum and specific workshops, such as ‘Road Safety’ workshops in Years 2 and 6. Mental wellbeing is key to a child’s happiness and areas such as understanding emotions and how to respond to these emotions are tackled through class and Key Stage assemblies as well as through some topics within the IPC curriculum. P4C and Burnett News offer the chance to develop children’s confidence when speaking in class. Listening and questioning skills are developed as well as open-mindedness through listening respectfully to others’ viewpoints. Burnet News explores scepticism and in particular teaches the children to question information which they have been given and check that they have a balanced argument with different viewpoints. This is a crucial skill to prepare them for the increase of ‘Fake News’ across many social media platforms.

Sex and Relationship Education (SRE)

We have chosen to provide an element of age-appropriate sex education to our Upper Key Stage 2 pupils. Parents are able, on request and after discussion with the Head Teacher, to withdraw their child from this. However, parents may not withdraw their child from any part of the relationships education nor the science national curriculum. The objective of relationships education at Clare House is to reach, in an age-appropriate way, the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of healthy relationships with friends, family and other people in order to help our children build an inclusive, tolerant society.

CHPS-Sex-and-Relationships-Education-Policy-May-2021.pdfCHPS-SRE-CURRICULUM

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Awareness

At Clare House School we recognise that the personal development of pupils, spiritually, morally, socially and culturally (SMSC) plays a significant part in their ability to learn and achieve. We therefore aim to provide an education that provides pupils with the opportunities to explore and develop each aspect of SMSC, as well as promote the fundamental British Values: democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect for and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs, and for those without faith. SMSC is a dimension of the whole school experience which makes the curriculum relevant, stimulating, creative and fun. It enriches each subject and the ethos of Clare House and is an essential ingredient of school success.

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