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Phonics

Phonics

We teach phonics using the SoundsWrite scheme which is a synthetic phonics programme that makes links between reading and writing from the outset.  In EYFS, reading books are matched closely to the grapheme-phonemes that children are learning.  Texts are appropriate for those pupils still learning basic reading skills. 


PHONICS-TEACHING-AT-CLARE-HOUSE-PRESENTATION-1-1.PPTXPhonics-teaching-overview-2023.pdf

Writing

Writing

High quality texts are used to support the teaching of writing.  Children write in a range of genres and for different purposes and audiences. We ensure that high-level vocabulary is used with links, where possible, to the curriculum.  Children learn how to edit and improve their work, with a focus on spelling, punctuation, and adventurous vocabulary choices. Children are given opportunities to write at length, demonstrating the various skills that have been taught.  Children take pride in their work and are taught to write in a pre-cursive script, leading to a cursive when appropriate.

Progression in Grammar and PunctuationProgression in Writing

Clare House English 

Reading

At Clare House, reading is embedded and developed across the curriculum.  Children are exposed to high quality and varied texts which foster a love of reading; developing a community of readers who read because they enjoy the excitement and surprise that the written word can bring. 

Through whole class reading, children receive an extensive experience of listening to, sharing and discussing a wide range of quality books with their teacher.  Children will develop their skills of decoding; explaining the meaning of vocabulary; retrieval; inference and prediction. Our reading curriculum is also delivered through, but not limited to, close text analysis, discreet phonics teaching and 1:1 reading. 

#BookMatch | The Reader Teacher
Clare-House-Core-Book-List-WCR Texts

CLare house core book list writing stimuli

Overview of reading at clare houseAT-HOME-READING-QUESTIONS-FOR-EYFS.PDFAt-Home-Reading-Questions-for-KS1.pdfAt-Home-Reading-Questions-for-KS2.pdf

Mathematics

Mathematics is taught discretely.  in blocks of different topics, with a mastery approach, giving children opportunities and time to deepen their understanding.  Children who master the basic concepts at a young age are able to grow into skilled mathematicians.  Maths is divided into the areas of: Number and place value, addition and subtraction, multiplication and division, fractions, decimals, percentages, measurement, geometry and statistics. Alongside this, children’s knowledge of the times tables up to 12 x 12 is a key focus.  In Year 4, children will take part in a statutory Multiplication Tables Check during the Summer term.

Clare-House-Calculation-Policy.pptxyear plan for mathsMATHS PROGRESSION Information-for-parents-2022-multiplication-tables-check.pdf

History

At Clare House, in history children develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history. They are taught to use key historical terms accurately and ask their own historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance. Children are expected to think critically and develop their knowledge of the past from a range of sources. By the end of their time at Clare House, they will be able to see the relationship between different periods of time and the impact on modern life.

By the end of KS1, a historian at Clare House are expected to…

  • Know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time.
  • Identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods.
  • Use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms.
  • Ask and answer questions.
  • Know and understand key features of events.
  • Understand the ways in which we find out about the past.
  • Identify different ways in which history is represented.

By the end of Lower KS2, a historian at Clare House are expected to…

  • Begin to be able to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British and world history.
  • Start to be able to identify connections, contrasts and trends over time.
  • Begin to be able to develop the appropriate use of historical terms, such as ‘empire’ and ‘civilisation.’
  • Begin to be able to address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Begin to be able to construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Begin to be able to construct knowledge of the past from a range of sources.
  • Begin to be able to describe the impact of history on modern life.

By the end of Upper KS2, a historian at Clare House are expected to…

  • Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history.
  • Be able to identify connections, contrasts and trends over time.
  • Develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • Regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • Be able to construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.
  • Be able to construct knowledge of the past from a range of sources.
  • Be able to describe the impact of history on modern life.

Geography

In Geography children are taught to develop: their knowledge of globally significant places, including defining human and physical characteristics; their understanding of processes that cause key physical and human characteristics and how these are interdependent; the geographical skills needed to collect and analyse data through fieldwork; skills needed to interpret a range of sources of geographical information (such as maps, globes, aerial photographs). Children are taught to communicate their geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps and also through writing.

By the end of KS1, a geographer at Clare House are expected to…

- Use maps, atlases and globes to name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans and also to name, locate and identify the characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas. 

- Understand and explain the simple geographical features of different places (through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country). 

- Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom and the location of hot and cold areas of the world in relation to the Equator and the North and South Poles. 

- Use geographical vocabulary accurately to refer to key physical features (including beach, cliff, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season and weather) and key human features (including city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop). 

- Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language to describe the location of features and routes on a map. 

- Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key. 

- Plan and record observations in fieldwork to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a geographer at Clare House are expected to…

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to: 

  1. locate the world’s countries focusing on Europe (including Russia) and North and South America; and  
  1. name and locate counties and cities of the UK, geographical regions and human and physical characteristics. 

Understand and explain the differences and similarities of different geographical places and how they affect and interact with each other. 

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to identify the UK’s key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time. 

- Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes. 

- Describe and understand key aspects human geography, including types of settlement and land use. 

- Use the 8 points of a compass to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world. 

- Plan and record observations in fieldwork productively to collect and record evidence to answer geographical questions. 

By the end of Upper KS2, a geographer at Clare House should be able to…

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to identify the environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, and major cities when locating the world’s countries. 

- Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones including day and night. 

- Explain how the different human and physical geographical features of a place interact with each other (through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country, and a region within North or South America). 

- Describe accurately key aspects of physical geography, including rivers and the water cycle. 

- Describe accurately key aspects of human geography, including: economic activity including trade links and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water. 

- Use four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key correctly (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps). 

- Use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies. 

Geography Overview

Science

Science is taught discretely, which enables us to meet the expectations set out in the National Curriculum.   We provide children with opportunities to investigate and make links with the wider world.  In EYFS, the children learn about changing states, changes in human and animal life cycles, habitiats, plants and forces such as floating and sinking.  At Key Stage 1, children are taught to work scientifically while learning about different elements of science, this includes the human body (senses), seasonal changes, materials, plants, living things and their habitats and growing and cooking. 

At Key Stage 2, children are also taught about rocks, fossils, soils, plants, light, forces and magnets, states of matter, grouping and classifying living things, sound, electricity, data collection, habitats, properties and changes of materials, states of matter, earth and space, the human body, food chains, reproduction, variation and adaptations, evolution and inheritance.  In Year 6 children are taught about diet, drugs, lifestyles and puberty with an element of age-appropriate sex education.

Science Overview

Art and Design

We teach art through a range of different key skills. These are drawing, painting, printing, textiles, sculpture and collage. We ensure that these skills are practised and developed across the Key Stages so that the children have a wealth of expertise from which they can make creative and informed choices about their own artwork. We also teach history of art to develop our children’s knowledge of a range of artists, their work and different art movements. We look at artists work for inspiration, as examples of particular skills and to develop children’s critical appreciation of art from different cultures and times.

By the end of KS1, an artist at Clare House should be able to…

-Make marks and draw lines purposefully and for artistic effect. 

- Mix colours purposefully for artistic effect  

- Use printing techniques for artistic effect and to develop a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.   

- Experiment and develop proficiency with a range of textile techniques for artistic effect. 

- Develop a growing awareness of shape and form and to develop a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.  

- Develop proficiency in a range of collage skills and techniques for artistic effect. 

- Have a knowledge of a variety of artists both contemporary and historical. 

By the end of Lower KS2, an artist at Clare House should be able to…

- Mix colours purposefully for artistic effect  

- Use printing techniques for artistic effect and to develop a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.   

- Experiment and develop proficiency with a range of textile techniques for artistic effect. 

- Sculpt with clay and develop a growing awareness of shape and form and to develop proficiency in a range of tools and techniques.  

- Develop proficiency in a range of collage skills and techniques for artistic effect. 

- Have a knowledge of a variety of artists both contemporary and historical. 

By the end of Upper KS2, an artist at Clare House should be able to…

- Combine different tools to create a drawing and explain why they have chosen those techniques.  

- Use a wide range of techniques in their work, to use a range of colours that they have created and to be able to discuss their own individual style.  

- Create a print that expresses their own ideas, observations and feelings and demonstrates a growing proficiency with tools and techniques.   

- Create a piece of work that uses tactile and visual elements and to be able to use tools and techniques with increasing proficiency. 

- Create a piece of sculpture that shows an awareness of shape, form and dimension and demonstrates good proficiency in a range of tools and techniques.  

- Compose and apply an understanding of shape and space in a piece of collage work and to select which skills and techniques they need to use to present their idea.  

- Have a knowledge of a variety of artists both contemporary and historical.  

 

Computing

Computing

At Clare House Primary School, we embrace current and emerging technologies to facilitate the learning experience of the whole school community. We aim for our children to be confident, competent and discerning users of digital technology and it is our intention that they have every opportunity available to achieve this.  We provide a computing curriculum that develops pupils’ learning and results in the acquisition of knowledge of the world around them. A clear and effective scheme of work is used to ensure that teaching and learning facilitate progression across all key stages within the strands of digital literacy, information technology and computer science.  Children will have access to the hardware (computers, tablets and programmable equipment) and software that they need to develop knowledge and skills of digital systems and their applications.  Furthermore, we provide a computing curriculum that prepares pupils to live safely in an increasingly digital society. At Clare House, children explore and respond to key issues such as digital communication, cyberbullying, online safety, security and social media. Through the wider curriculum, displays, parental communication, safer internet days and assemblies equip children with the knowledge they need to stay safe online, enabling them to have a secure and comprehensive knowledge of the implications of technology and digital systems

Music

The music curriculum at Clare House is delivered through a combination of specialist music teachers from Bromley Youth Music Trust and music schemes that follow the Model Music Curriculum. Throughout their Clare House journey, children will:

  • learn to play the Djembe Drums.
  • learn to play the recorder
  • take part in the ‘Band on the Run’ project (brass/woodwind)
  • take part in the UKS2 school choir

Children will be given the opportunity to showcase their musical skills at various performances throughout the year.  Following the Model Music Curriculum, teachers will focus on skills such as: playing pitched and unpitched instruments; developing musical vocabulary; using the inter-related dimensions of music (e.g. using pulse, pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, timbre, texture and structure) to create, select and combine sounds; improvisation; recognising stave and other musical notation; composition; and evaluating recorded and live music.  In addition to this, we have weekly singing assemblies, where children learn songs from different genres and cultures.  We also celebrate composers from around the world. 

P.E.

P.E.

At Clare House our aim is for all pupils to have access to a high-quality PE curriculum that inspires them to have a life-long passion for sport, fitness and wellbeing. We believe that all children should have opportunities to compete against themselves and others, reaching their own ‘personal best’. At Clare House we aim for pupils to experience a wide range of sports and games that promote the development of the fundamental skills and to develop the values of sportsmanship, which they will take into wider society.

The teaching of P.E is delivered through a combination of external and internal specialist teachers. In EYFS and Key Stage 1, fundamental movement skills and coordination are taught and practised through a variety of activities. In Key Stage 2, children practise and learn a broad range of skills, enabling them to play competitive games. Whilst at Clare House, children are given the opportunity to participate in swimming lessons, enabling them children to learn how to swim 25 meters competently and perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations. Children also take part in games competitions, competing against other schools.

By the end of KS1, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Master the fundamental movements (running, jumping, hoping, side-stepping, walking backwards, running backwards, skipping and galloping). 

- Master basic agility, balance and co-ordination skills, individually and with others. 

- Send and receive successfully, using a variety of objects. 

- Successfully employ simple tactics for defending and attacking as an individual. 

- Engage in competitive physical activities successfully (both against self and against others). 

- Begin to learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and copy teacher movements to make actions (Dance) and sequences of movement (Gymnastics). 

- Work well individually and with others, learning to take turns if needed and work co-operatively as part of a team. 

By the end of Lower KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Demonstrate a broad range of skills and demonstrate these in isolation and small groups/ conditioned matches. 

- Begin to develop flexibility, strength, technique, control, balance and stamina. 

- Begin to understand simple tactics and formations to use in a team environment. 

- Begin to learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and link them to make actions (Dance) and sequences of movement (Gymnastics). 

- Demonstrate an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports, reflecting on the performance of self and peers. 

- Follow the sportsmanship code and demonstrate the qualities that make a great team member. 

- Enjoy communicating and competing with mates and self (Individual best). 

By the end of Upper KS2, a child at Clare House should be able to…

- Continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, in isolation and small groups/ matches. 

- Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control, balance and stamina. 

- Successfully employ simple tactics or creative process in practical settings. 

- Learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and link them to make precise actions (Dance) and sequences of movement (Gymnastics). 

- Explain specific progression routes in different physical activities and coach peers to help them improve. 

- Demonstrate effect and appropriate communication, collaboration and respectful competition with each other and self (Individual best).  

- Confidently lead an activity e.g. warm up, cool down, simple game, which engages all others involved, showing respect and empathy. 

PE-OVERVIEW-23-24.pdf

R.E.

R.E.

At Clare House, RE is taught discretely.  The curriculum enables children to gain knowledge and understanding of different faiths and religions.  We follow the principles and guidelines set out by the Bromley Agreed Syllabus.  The children acquire knowledge and an understanding of Christianity and other principle religions such as Hinduism, Judaism, Islam and Buddhism, developing respect and sensitivity towards others. They express and explore pupils’ own responses to ultimate questions about the meaning and purpose of life, self, and the issues of right and wrong.

RE Overview

Primary Languages

French is taught throughout Key Stage 2 by a Primary Languages specialist.  The lessons follow a bespoke curriculum, using a variety of engaging, authentic resources.  This skills-based scheme is underpinned by the three pillars of progression- phonics, grammar and vocabulary as outlined in the National Curriculum. We also provide regular opportunities for intercultural understanding.  The provision is enhanced through the offer of a Spanish and Duolingo intervention for children in KS2. 

progression-in-FOREIGN Languages

Personal, Social, Health Economic Education (PSHE)

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (PSHE)

PSHE is taught through the themes of Living in the Wider World, Relationships and Health and Wellbeing.  We teach the knowledge, skills and attributes to stay healthy and safe and to be prepared for life and work. 

PSHE is taught through discrete weekly lessons, weekly Key Stage assemblies, class circle assemblies, and specific workshops.  These include ‘Road Safety’ workshops in Years 2 and 6, and themes of assemblies throughout the school year, including, ‘Sharing the Road’ assemblies, and Odd Socks Day assembly.

Mental wellbeing is key to a child’s happiness and areas such as understanding emotions and how to respond to these emotions are taught through class and Key Stage assemblies and weekly lessons.  We also refer to the Zones of Regulation to explicitly teach children how to regulate their own emotions and become resilient when faced with setbacks.   

Listening and questioning skills are developed as well as open-mindedness through listening respectfully to others’ viewpoints.  We teach the children to question the information which they have been given and check that they have a balanced argument with different viewpoints. 

PSHE Overview

Relationships and Sex Education (RSE)

Relationship and Sex Education (RSE)

 The objective of Relationships’ education at Clare House is to reach, in an age-appropriate way, the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of healthy relationships with friends, family and other people in order to help our children build an inclusive, tolerant society.  Relationships’ education is taught throughout the school.  We have chosen to provide an element of age-appropriate sex education to our Year 6 pupils.  Parents are able, on request and after discussion with the school, to withdraw their child from this.  However, parents may not withdraw their child from any part of the Relationships’ education or the science national curriculum. 

CHPS-Sex-and-Relationships-Education-PolicyCHPS-SRE-CURRICULUM

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Awareness

At Clare House School, we recognise that the personal development of pupils, spiritually, morally, socially and culturally (SMSC) plays a significant part in their ability to learn and achieve.  We, therefore, aim to provide an education that offers pupils the opportunity to explore and develop each aspect of SMSC, as well as promote the fundamental British Values: democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect for and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs, and for those without faith.  SMSC is a dimension of the whole school experience which makes the curriculum relevant, stimulating, creative and fun.  It enriches each subject and the ethos of Clare House and is an essential ingredient of school success. 

smsc-at-clare-house.pdf

Design and Technology

We believe that good design puts people first. We encourage children to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values.

At Clare House the children explore skills in research, design, making, evaluating, and they develop technical knowledge and skills. We encourage children to learn, think and intervene creatively to solve problems both as individuals and as members of a team. Our lessons aim to be inspiring, rigorous and practical, with children getting real, hands-on experience.

By the end of KS1, a designer at Clare House should be able to…

- To design purposeful, functional and appealing products. To draw their design and choose materials from a selection provided.

- To develop their technical knowledge of skills, equipment and materials to make textile products. To learn simple sewing and create a design on fabric.

- To develop their technical knowledge of skills, equipment and materials to build structures and use mechanisms in their work. To learn different joining skills with card and how to make a structure more stable.

- To develop their knowledge of skills, equipment and materials in cookery and nutrition. To use simple tools safely and learn basic food hygiene.

- To evaluate existing products and their own designs and ideas

By the end of Lower KS2, a designer at Clare House should be able to…

  • To design innovative, functional and appealing products. Use a wider range of materials and consider their functional and aesthetic qualities.
  • To develop their technical knowledge of skills, equipment and materials to make textile products. To cut fabric and learn sewing basics.
  • To develop their technical knowledge of skills, equipment and materials to build structures and use mechanisms in their work. To score and cut and fold card and pay attention to the finishing of products.
  • To develop their knowledge of skills, equipment and materials in cookery and nutrition. To peel, chop, slice and grate food and to knead and roll out dough.
  • To evaluate existing products and their own designs and ideas. To identify and discuss strengths and areas for improvement.

By the end of Upper KS2, an designer at Clare House should be able to…

  •  To use their own research to develop and design innovative, functional and appealing products. To select and explain their choice of materials and the functional and aesthetic qualities of their design.
  • To develop their technical knowledge of skills, equipment and materials to make textile products. To make a paper pattern and develop their sewing skills and be able to include a fastening component.
  • To develop their technical knowledge of skills, equipment and materials to build structures and use mechanisms in their work. To measure and cut and join materials accurately. To include technology within their design.
  • To develop their knowledge of skills, equipment and materials in cookery and nutrition. To prepare and cook food in an oven.
  • To evaluate existing products and their own designs and ideas. To discuss whether a product is fit for purpose and take part in peer evaluation.
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